Can religious hype make up for weak faith?

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“Come and hear a great sermon by our charismatic pastor…”

“Our church is the best church in the city…”

“Our worship leader is sooooo anointed…”

“A church alive is worth the drive…”

“Compassion is in our church’s DNA; it’s who we are and what we do…”

Have you ever heard any claims like these? I’ve heard them; and have even used some of them.

Yes, and others, such as:

“Come and hear some anointed music and preaching…”

“Come and witness the power of God in action…”

“Let’s release our faith and watch God release His glory into this situation…”

No, I’m not opposed to praise and worship! I’d better not be, because Heaven is full of it.

I’m not against testifying of God’s work in my life.

I don’t think it’s wrong to believe God when the local church body has gathered together.

But I don’t understand competition between churches, nor the marketing hype used to sell church services. 

Somehow I can’t bring myself to believe Jesus “leading” someone to act in such a way.

“But people need to hear what God’s doing…”

Listen. Whenever God does something, people can’t, excuse me, WON’T keep quiet! Even when Jesus tells them not to tell anyone, they do it anyway!

The whole earth, all of God’s creation, is shouting “Hey, look everyone! There is a God in Heaven!”

The resurrection of Jesus declares the love and power of God; and He demonstrated them both on our account.

The Kingdom of God has gotten along fine for a number of years; even without a special ad campaign, marketing execs, or branding experts.

The woman at the well (John 4) was pricked in her heart when she encountered love for the very first time.

No amount of hype will do that. 

Peter was asked to come raise Dorcas from the dead after the disciples in Joppa heard what had happened in Lydda (Acts 9).

No, it wasn’t a TV ad or YouTube video which got everyone’s attention.

People who experienced God told others about God.

Am I saying it’s wrong to tell people what God is doing? No.

But let’s not have faith in the hype. Let’s not believe in the power of a well developed ad, media display, or Facebook account.

Trusting in carnal ways never builds the kingdom of God. It only promotes the kingdom of man, competition, jealousy, discord and strife among the brethren.

Trusting in God’s word, power and authority draws multitudes to the middle of the desert to hear some wild looking cat tell them they must repent. Right John?

Let’s quit trying to mask our weak faith with religious hype.

God knows the difference; and frankly, the world does, as well.