A Pleasurable Python?

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How much pleasure can be derived from having a 12 foot Python as a pet? A pet, according to the dictionary, is “a domesticated animal kept for pleasure rather than utility.” So how would someone find pleasure in a huge, powerful snake?

Maybe the snake could be trained to fetch a newspaper. Imagine the look on the paperboy’s face as the snake meets them at the door at six o’clock in the morning.

Perhaps it could be trained to give full body massages? But could you ever be certain it wouldn’t massage you just a bit too much?

And what would you do if, when you’re cuddling with it while watching your favorite movie, it turns to give you a little peck on the cheek and latches on to your ear, instead? Would you say, softly and tenderly, “Petunia (that’s the snake’s name), please let go. I know you love me, but I really need my ear. Please be nice. Remember, I’m the master and you’re my pet. PETUNIA! LET GO!!!

Can anyone REALLY trust a snake?

Is there any way to successfully reason with a snake? If a snake COULD be tamed, how long might it take? Does a snake ever become a true pet, as in domesticated, or does the snake’s “owner” become the snake’s pet? Which one enjoys the “relationship” the most; Petunia or the owner?

I’ve read that Pythons, depending on the exact breed, are approximately 12-40 inches long when they hatch. To some, that’s such an adorable size. But I’ve also read they can reach lengths upwards of 12, 20, and in some cases, 50 feet long!

I don’t care who you are; that is NOT adorable! THAT is scary!

Note: I really wanted to show a picture of a giant python, but thought it would be too distasteful. So, please enjoy the picture of one of my “nephews”. His name is Kirby. A TRUE PET.

How about if I give you a little secret?

If you don’t want to be devoured by a snake, don’t try and keep it as a pet!

Yes, there is definitely a spiritual application here.

“Now it happened, as we went to prayer, that a certain slave girl possessed with a spirit of divination met us, who brought her masters much profit by fortune-telling. This girl followed Paul and us, and cried out, saying, “These men are the servants of the Most High God, who proclaim to us the way of salvation.” And this she did for many days. But Paul, greatly annoyed, turned and said to the spirit, “I command you in the name of Jesus Christ to come out of her.” And he came out that very hour.”” (Acts 16:16-18 NKJV)

The phrase, “spirit of divination”, refers to the spirit of “Pythia”. Pythia was connected with the city of Delphi, in Ancient Greece.

“Pythias were virgins who dedicated their lives to prophesying on behalf of the god Apollo. The first Pythia is said to have been the goddess Themis.

“Delphi in ancient times was considered the center of the known world, the place where heaven and earth met. Delphi is known as the center of worship for the Apollo, son of Zeus who embodied moral discipline and spiritual clarity. But even before the area was associated with
Apollo there were other deities worshiped here including the earth goddess Gaia, Themis, Demeter and Poseidon, the god of the sea. By the end of Mycenaean period Apollo has displaced these other deities and became the guardian of the oracle. The oracle of Delphi was a spiritual experience whereby the spirit of Apollo was asked for advise on critical matters relating to people’s lives or affairs of the state. Questions were asked to Pythia or the priestess who” channeled” the spirit of the God. As the reputation of the oracle at Delphi grew, the sanctuary began to develop into an international center as the Greek city – states brought offerings and it was governed by aristocrats. It became the center of a 12 member federation called Amphictyonia which was a sort League of Nations which unified the small city – states. journey, thousands of visitors sought guidance from the holy woman, called the *Pythia, who spoke on behalf of the gods.” (From the website, Greece Taxi. For more info, visit http://www.greecetaxi.gr/index/delphi_oracle.html)

Spiritual deception, which leads to spiritual bondage and an eternity without Christ, is not something recently concocted. Its root can be traced all the way back to the Garden of Eden, where the subtle serpent slithered its way into the lives of Adam and Eve. An innocent looking creature, it squeezed the life out of the first couple with its enchanting ways. Wrapping rebellious words of doubt around their hearts, Adam and Eve were left to die a slow physical death. Yet the spiritual death they experienced was instantaneous!

No one can really tame the serpent. No one can really be friends with a snake.

The woman with a spirit of divination, who could supposedly foretell future events, wasn’t in control of the python spirit; it controlled her! Her “masters” controlled her money, and the serpent controlled her spirit. She was a slave to a vile, hellish master; the devil.

I would imagine her “gift” was discovered at an early age. Encouraged to “develop” her talents, it is possible her relatives introduced her to others who were “gifted” like her.

It’s the way a python attacks its prey. It gets close, then bites. As its powerful mouth holds its victim, it begins to coil its body around the victim’s rib cage, squeezing all of the air from the lungs. Once the victim’s lungs are empty, they can no longer fill with air so the victim is asphyxiated. Then, it becomes the main course.

There is not a single “gift”, originating from the realm of darkness, that is good in any sense of the word. No one EVER needs to be delivered from “good”! Paul commanded the spirit of Pythias to come out of the young woman, using the GOOD and ALL POWERFUL NAME OF JESUS!

Every good and perfect gift comes from above (God’s Domain) – James 1:17. It overcomes every controlling spirit which comes from below (the devil’s domain).

I guess what I’m trying to say is this: it isn’t wise to play with pythons, evil spirits, or even “not-so-bad” humanistic ideas. It doesn’t make good sense to continually light a fire in your lap and expect not to be burnt (Proverbs 6:27). And you can’t make something good out of something evil. Maybe what you’re doing, and who you’re keeping company with, doesn’t seem “that bad”. The television shows you can’t live without may be just a “little bit” sinful (you’ve recognized a little conviction from time to time).

But remember, pythons aren’t hatched measuring 50 feet.

What kind of “pet” are you keeping these days? What does it cost to keep it “healthy”?

Can you really afford it? Is the pleasure worth the price?